f

Get in on this viral marvel and start spreading that buzz! Buzzy was made for all up and coming modern publishers & magazines!

Fb. In. Tw. Be.

For Tiffany Haddish to make light of Cosby’s wrongdoing is nothing short of disappointing. The situation is no laughing matter.

By Jessica Dulaney Fresh off the release of the hit film Girls Trip, comedian and actress Tiffany Haddish has been charming audiences around the world while working the press circuit. She appeared on Jimmy Kimmel Live to gush about her escapades with her co-star Jada Pinkett Smith; she was featured on The Breakfast Club to share her story of surviving domestic abuse and poverty to help raise her younger siblings and she dazzled on a recent cover of Essence magazine. Suffice it to say Haddish has been glowing in this newfound spotlight. Throughout her promotion for Girls Trip, Haddish has proven herself to be hilarious, down-to-earth, and downright likable. Celebrated as the breakout star of the film, she seems poised to take over Hollywood as the new comedic it-girl. However, a disturbing answer to a routine interview question now threatens to erode her newfound good graces in the eyes of the public. In an interview with the Los Angeles Times released last week, Haddish outlined her unlikely path to fame from foster care to comedy camp to sitcom scenes. She was one of eighteen black women comedians interviewed about their careers and the state of the industry. When asked to name some of her comedic inspirations, Haddish took an unexpected turn with her comments and named–of all people–Bill Cosby. For those out of the loop, in the past year, nearly sixty women have come forward to accuse Cosby of sexual assault. Cosby himself has admitted to extramarital affairs that included the non-consensual use of Quaaludes. While the court case ended in mistrial, the Cosby controversy is far from over, and the world is still reeling from the horrific revelation of a formerly beloved icon’s true character.
Related: CAPING FOR CHRIS BROWN WON’T MAKE HIM LOVE YOU

Hopefully Lana Del Rey’s perspective continues to broaden, and her desire for peace spurs her and her listeners into decisive action.

By Roslyn Talusan Lana Del Rey’s 4th major label album, Lust for Life was released last week. The record has been deemed a departure from Del Rey’s hallmark darkness and depression, in direct response to the catastrophe that is the current American political landscape. Her team has been marketing Lust as a brighter, more upbeat entry in her discography, and is a commentary on where we are as a society, and where she hopes we’re headed. Specifically, Del Rey has said that while she made her first albums for herself, this album is for her fans. The goal of Lust is to soothe, comfort, and empower her listeners affected by the 2016 American election. I was skeptical about this at first. Del Rey has often been gratuitous with her creativity at the expense of marginalized groups. One of her most iconic images as an artist is her appropriating an Indigenous headdress in the "Ride" video, and her portrayed herself as a Latina sex worker in "Tropico". The hallmark of her music, along with a leaked clip filmed by Eli Roth where Del Rey stars in a horrifying visceral rape scene, is how she glamorizes and romanticizes domestic violence. Moreover, she's made comments about how feminism just isn't that interesting to her, and that she’d rather discuss our galactic possibilities.
Related: LANA DEL REY’S HONESTY ABOUT MENTAL HEALTH HELPED ME ADDRESS MY OWN

The new HBO series is slated to do what Hollywood has done for decades: fictionalize very real Black pain for profit.

On Wednesday, HBO announced that after the conclusion of Game of Thrones, the network will tap the show creators, David Benioff and D.B. Weiss, for a new alternate history series called Confederate. The show is set in a fictionalized timeline where the South seceded from the Union and where slavery has continued into the modern era. The cast is complete with a suite of slave hunters, Confederate politicians, and even a group of slaveholding executives and the families they control. From the looks of it, HBO's new series Confederate is slated to do what Hollywood has done for decades: fictionalize very real Black pain for commercial profit. After all, this show’s premise proposes to create a “fictionalized” plot about the continuation of slavery, as if thousands of American farmers and corporations didn't continue to practice slavery well into the 1940s. The show acts as if the latter half of the twentieth century didn't see America's prison population swell with millions of Black bodies. It pretends that today’s prisons and venerable corporations don't exploit the 13th amendment to profit from forced prison labor. HBO’s Confederate imagines that there aren't more people under state control today than there were in chains at the peak of American slavery.
Related: THEY CANCELED “UNDERGROUND” BECAUSE WHITE PEOPLE DON’T LIKE NON-COMPLIANT SLAVES

I dare not praise this exciting episode’s success without bowing down to the women played in it.

By Rachael Edwards [Warning: spoilers ahead] A girl is still recovering from last night’s Season 7  premiere of "Game of Thrones". My voice is hoarse from screaming every other scene, and my edges have fallen off from how flawlessly this show can juggle fifteen thousand storylines. Historically, GoT’s represented women as strong, but still disposable. With heavy criticism from fans who watched women characters being sexually and physically abused, the show seems to be taking a 360 degree turn, redeeming these characters with esteem and in-depth storylines. I dare not praise this exciting episode’s success without bowing down to the women played in it. 1. Arya Stark: The opening scene is Lord Walder Frey giving a toast to the men that aided him during the Red Wedding. The men raise their glasses and take a drink. Lord Frey, visibly, does not. He talks to them about how they killed all the Starks, save one. All of a sudden we see the men who took a drink begin to choke and grumpy ass Frey peels his face off  and well damn, it’s fucking Arya. Fuck her damn hitlist - Arya is not just going out for key players, this girl time to take out their supporters. Was I the only one who cackled when she met up with (peasant) Sheeran and crew and she told them she was going to kill Cersei?  They thought she was kidding. I’m dying to see what more damage she is going to do to her enemies. 2. Sansa Stark: Sansa, you’re doing amazing sweetie. I almost threw my drink when she talked all over her brother, Jon Snow, when they were trying to sort out what to do with the Houses who betrayed (deceased) Robb Stark, the war in the  South, and the arrival of winter. I’m just going to get it out of the way and say that women should talk over men like they talk over us all the damn time. Brava, sis. She even shut down Littlefinger when he tried to whisper bitternothings into her ear about her right to be Queen of the North. I live! 3. Lyanna Mormont: I said this before and I’ll say it again, Lyanna might just make me believe white women can do this feminism thing right. Instead of rallying behind a Scarlett Johanssen–white women need to cape and learn from House Mormont. Lyanna was involved in what seemed to be a community forum with Jon Snow. When I tell you she got those older folks together! She’s stern and no one questions her judgement. She is defying the conventional notions of age and sound judgement.  Lyanna will always have the final word, and who gon’ check her? 4. Brienne of Tarth: I always have to collect myself when Brienne walks into scene. Her character is bae-incarnate. When she is not trying to help poor Podrick learn how to fight, she is right behind Sansa ready to snatch anyone who dares to harm her. This season, Brienne is in charge of protecting Sansa. Brienne came through with the, “Why is he [Littlefinger]  still here?” It reminds me of when your friend just broke up with her boyfriend, but he’s still coming over to pick up the rest of his *things* and you have to check her asking him why he’s still there. Brienne is that girl who is going to hold you accountable.
Related: “ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK” HAS RETURNED WITH MORE BLACK PAIN

Given the racism found in speculative fiction as well as the lack of onscreen Black representation, the adaptation Nnedi Okorafor's “Who Fears Death” should be celebrated instead of overshadowed.

By Latonya Pennington Nnedi Okorafor is one of the most successful Black speculative fiction writers in existence today. Last year, she won a Hugo award and a Nebula award for her sci-fi novella “Binti”. Now, her post apocalyptic SFF book “Who Fears Death” is going to be adapted into an HBO television series. Yet, VICE magazine decided to make this accomplishment about author and executive producer, George R.R. Martin. First, let me start off by saying George R.R. Martin is not to blame for this. VICE magazine probably thought no one would read the piece if they put the name of a lesser known Black female writer first. Therefore, they used Martin's fame in order to get clicks and views. Not only is this disrespectful, but it is racist. By putting Martin's name before Okorafor's and cropping Okorafor's name off her own book cover, VICE has made it seem like a black female writer needed help from a super famous white male author. In other words, Martin is positioned as a white savior to a Nigerian-American author.
Related: TNT’S “CLAWS” CELEBRATES BLACK WOMEN’S SEXUALITY

You don't have permission to register