f

Get in on this viral marvel and start spreading that buzz! Buzzy was made for all up and coming modern publishers & magazines!

Fb. In. Tw. Be.

American Horror Story: Cult doesn’t give justice to the American horror story that is being a QTPOC.

By Dr. Jonathan P. Higgins American Horror Story is in its seventh season and like many television shows, the writers have opted to use elements of art to make a social statement about the political mess that we are currently experiencing in the U.S.. This season, the show decided to focus on a middle American family with two white queer women named Ally (Sara Paulson) and Ivy (Alison Pill), a married couple with a young son name Oz (Cooper Dodson). Ally suffers from several phobias and her world begins to crumble after learning that Trump was elected as President. This begins to cause strain on her relationship with her partner as several of Ally’s phobias begin to take over day-to-day life, specifically her fear of clowns as Ally begins to believe that clowns are not only stalking her and her family, but killing several of her friends and neighbors on their street. Just four episodes in, the show has addressed several issues connected to the culture that Trump’s presidency has exacerbated or inspired: including racism, homophobia and advocacy. The show has addressed several topics related to the fear that many marginalized people face. By validating Ally’s fears, this season's theme opens up a great conversation about how her phobias were heightened after the the announcement of Trump’s presidency. Meanwhile, queer/trans people of color have faced these fears for decades. Since the late 1960s, QTPOC have lived in fear. From the attacks on Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera during Stonewall riots, to the attacks on Bayard Rustin during the civil rights movement, QTPOC have lived in a world knowing that almost everyone hates or fears them. The statistics only prove this to be true, specifically with trans women of color. According to the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP), the majority of hate violence happened to transgender women. 2016 marked the deadliest year for trans women of color, with 27 deaths being reported and that did not include deaths that were not reported or cases where the person was misgendered. 2017 is proving to be no different, as there have been 22 reported death of trans individuals, with one already being reported in the last month.
Related: THE CASTING OF A NEW ‘DOCTOR WHO’ IS A VICTORY FOR WHITE WOMEN AND NOT MUCH ELSE

The new Powerpuff Girl, Bliss, is so important to little brown girls around the world who sit watching the rebooted version of the show today.

By Jonita Davis There used to be only one way to get my three girls, ages 2, 4, and 6 to settle down long enough to give me a break. I would pop in a DVD of The Powerpuff Girls cartoons or turn to a marathon on Cartoon Network. The girls would watch the show, mesmerized by the colors, the story, and the action for at least a half hour. They each had a designated Powerpuff Girl. The oldest was Blossom, the four-year-old was Buttercup, and the youngest was always Bubbles. They would keep these parts for years, and act out their own fights for the safety of Townsville in my living room. Many a lamp and three couches were sacrificed to the cause. My little brown-skinned girls would imagine themselves as these bold, magical characters and would spend hours recreating their favorite episodes or making up completely new villains and storylines. When their little brother came along a few years later, he would assume the role of either the professor or the villain of the hour. No, he could not be one of The Powerpuff Girls, those parts were only for girls. I have to admit that I loved seeing my girls using their imaginations to make up stories that required courage, confidence, and even more imagination to fulfill. I truly believed that seeing girls in a position of power and intelligence on screen had something to do with the confidence and strength my girls have now. Today, my Blossom is about to celebrate her 21st birthday in a few days. My Buttercup is 1500 miles away at college, and my Bubbles is working her way through her senior year in high school. They are all strong and independent women. I think all those Powerpuff Girls sessions had something to do with that.
Related: LOVING MAGICAL GIRLS AS A BLACK NON-BINARY PERSON

Needless to say, we are hella excited for Insecure season three.

WARNING — Insecure spoilers ahead By Rachael Edwards HBO’s  Insecure wrapped up its sophomoric season last night. Fans are wavering on whether or not the show ended on its best foot. This was a season that was frustrating and made me throw my phone at the end but the season finale tied some loose ends and made us hopeful for the third season of Insecure. Molly navigated the corporate world as a Black woman and discovered she is getting paid (significantly) less than her white colleagues. Office politics can be a touchy subject because its roots run deep into respectability politics. Recall when Molly asked the office assistant in season 1 to tone down her blackness, encouraging her to learn the art of code-switching. Molly quickly learns that code-switching will not save her. It was disappointing to see Molly so out of touch with this reality and wading in respectability-swamps. The implicit biases projected on women of color is a huge part of the reason why Molly is not getting paid at the same rate as her white (men and women) colleagues. Season two of Insecure concluded with Molly putting Dro to the side to focus on her wants and needs. This is what we needed to see and what fans clung onto because stability in Molly’s life was imperative. Watching her get down with her colleague Quentin (Lil Rey Howery) was refreshing, especially since they were not interested in entertaining white people at the firm. Molly had the most interesting storyline this season.
Related: IN ISSA RAE’S “INSECURE,” SISTERHOOD IS EVERYTHING

There are still people who believe that people who are truly mentally ill don’t talk publicly about it and this movie helps cement this damaging idea in their minds.

[TW: THIS ARTICLE CONTAINS SPOILERS FOR INGRID GOES WEST & DISCUSSES SUICIDE] By Sarah Khan When I saw the advert for Ingrid Goes West and saw that it starred two of my personal favourite actresses working today—Aubrey Plaza and Elizabeth Olsen—I was damned excited to watch it. I did so last weekend and though I went in with a decent idea of what to expect from the film, the irresponsible and problematic ending ruined the entire experience for me. Ingrid Goes West is the story of Ingrid Thorburn (Plaza), a 20-something woman who, since the death of her mother, has been developing unhealthy and one-sided obsessions with Instagram personalities. The movie opens with Ingrid spraying mace into the face of a bride, who happened to be someone Ingrid had been obsessively following on Instagram. The next few scenes show Ingrid in a mental health facility getting the help it’s obvious she needs and when she’s released (and regains possession of her iPhone), she returns home and falls back into her addiction to Instagram. In a magazine, she reads about Taylor Sloane (Olsen), an LA-based artist who documents her enviable life through Instagram. Ingrid begins to follow her and after one interaction with Taylor via Instagram comments, Ingrid takes the substantial amount of money she inherited after her mother’s death and moves west to Los Angeles. Once there, she spots Taylor at a local store and follows her home, then kidnaps her dog in order to meet Taylor and her husband, Ezra. Having successfully inserted herself into Taylor’s life with lies and manipulation, Ingrid’s new life is threatened by the arrival of Taylor’s brother, Nicky (Billy Magnussen), who eventually exposes Ingrid leading to her being shunned by her so-called friends on whom she spies through the house next door, which she used the last of her money to purchase.
Related: 5 UNLIKELY FILMS ABOUT MENTAL HEALTH AND HEALING

Remaining politically neutral while a majority of the population faces systemic oppression is Taylor Swift’s trademark.

After a peaceful year of silence during her recluse from the public eye, I regret to inform you Taylor “Snake-Ass Becky” Swift is at it again. Swift’s name has resurfaced in the media over the past couple of weeks with the details of court proceedings in DJ David Mueller’s lawsuit and her respective countersuit making their way around the Internet. Mueller filed a $3 million lawsuit claiming defamation over Swift alleging that he sexually assaulted her at a meet-and-greet while she was on tour in 2013. The allegations, reported to his bosses by Swift’s mother, resulted in Mueller being fired from a Denver radio station. Mueller claimed that she ruined his career. Swift responded to the lawsuit by counter-claiming for sexual assault—she alleged that he grabbed her ass under her skirt while she posed for a photo with him and his girlfriend. She requested a whopping $1 in damages. Surprisingly, the judge hearing the case dismissed Mueller’s lawsuit and found that he was guilty of sexual assaulting Swift. She won her $1 and, in a statement, acknowledged “the privilege that she benefits from in life” that allowed her to afford legal counsel, and pledged to donate to organizations that help survivors of sexual violence defend themselves.
Related: INTERSECTIONALITY AIN’T FOR WHITE WOMEN

You don't have permission to register