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If the women's movement is to make any kind of meaningful progress, it must first make Black lives matter.

On Jan. 21 2017, the Women's March on Washington led what many now believe was the largest single-day demonstration in recorded U.S. history. Organized by experienced women of color activists and organizers (Linda Sarsour, Tamika Mallory, and Carmen Perez), the march called on women of diverse backgrounds, including immigrant, queer/trans, and Muslim women, to demonstrate a show of force against the new regime of Donald Trump, which has so far been built almost exclusively on a platform of anti-women, anti-immigrant, anti-Black, anti-Muslim and xenophobic rhetoric. Despite the impressive critical mass that turned out on January 20th, however, there were substantial and substantiated criticisms of the march: notwithstanding its leadership by women of color, the march was largely white, cisgender, and middle-class in representation. Amidst white women's calls that "women's rights are humans rights," there was little discussion of the way in which white women have historically colluded with white patriarchy in the oppression of Black people to obtain their rights, nor was there discussion of white women's historical participation in the genocide and oppression of Indigenous people. Not to mention that it was white women who, more than any other single group of people, voted Donald Trump into the presidential office by an overwhelming majority.
Related: ON ITS FOURTH BIRTHDAY, BLACK LIVES MATTER DOUBLES DOWN ON AN INTERSECTIONAL AGENDA

Facing political instability on its anniversary, Black Lives Matter presents an energetic new game plan.

After fours years of rapid national expansion, the future of the Black Lives Matter movement is uncertain. The 2016 presidential election of Donald Trump and the concurrent Republican sweep of Congress radically transformed the national political landscape. And for advocacy organizations like the Black Lives Matter Network, the prospect of garnering nationwide policy change has plummeted. In the first half of this year, the organization has spent much time recoiling from this conservative revolution. Both the Washington Post and BuzzFeed have reported a slowdown in BLM street protests. And in a recent NPR interview, Black Lives Matter network co-founder, Patrisse Khan-Cullors referred to the movement’s national prospects as “devastating.” However last week, on its fourth anniversary, the BLM Network took account of the movement’s victories to date and articulated a robust new game plan for operating in Trump's America moving forward. In the 55 page report, organizers sketched out how a localized, intersectional agenda can keep the movement’s momentum going during this time of political uncertainty.
Related: RACIST UBER INCIDENT INDICATIVE OF SYSTEMIC FAILINGS

In response to the National Rifle Association’s recent release of a series of aggressive recruitment videos, including one that targets Women’s March Co-President Tamika Mallory, local Los Angeles organizations have released their own video demanding that the NRA remove theirs.  See video here: https://youtu.be/twNkyxdNoQ8   “We

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